Seek The Light

Insert witty, intelligent, inspiring whatnot here

52,994 notes

bootyguruclub:

aripinthefabricofreality:

inspiredmuslimah:

The man in the picture is Rachid Nekkaz, a French-Algerian businessman living in France.

He heard about the niqab ban in France. Then he announced that he will pay all fines for women who wear the niqab - not just in France but “in any country in the world that bans women from doing so”.

He opened a fund of € 1 million. Then he said, “My sister, go out free wherever you want and I will pay the fine for you”

Allahu Akbar, May Allah reward him.

Take note FEMA this is how you properly do activism to help women who cover themselves. 

amazing

(via reverseracism)

22,988 notes

invisiblelad:

the-goddamazon:

theoriginalimpossiblesoufflegirl:

irishfino:

yungmethuselah:

blacksupervillain:

yungmethuselah:

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

Reporters confirm that police & advisors concealed the identity of Darren Wilson until he could delete all social media & move out of state.

Wow though. Darren Wilson, Ferguson’s PD and the rest of his and their supporters are an extra special breed of scumbag. What incriminating shit did he have online that needed to be swept under the rug so quickly?

I guarantee you there was some racist shit on his facebook

And it’s sitting around somewhere, still, just waiting for a subpoena. It’ll come out, it’d better come out. I’m just livid that murderer is being shielded from public scrutiny while the innocent child whose life he ended for walking outside in broad daylight while Black is being defamed.

i can’t wait until that stuff he tried to delete resurfaces because nothing is ever deleted on the internet. in fact, plenty of ToS for social sites tell you they’re gonna keep your data, not to mention the cached copies the savvy could dig up on their own, i’m sure
[popcorn]

especially on facebook. and even if it’s not subpoenaed, you can bet your bottom dollar that anonymous will be on that shit forthwith

In fact, somebody better tip Anonymous off to dig ALL THAT SHIT UP.

Over the past few days I’ve been thinking about how vile and disturbing the social media of the few cops that have made the news in Ferguson and how their twitter feeds and facebook posts going viral were more damning than their behavior broadcast across the airwaves over the past few weeks. Nobody that noxious can keep it hidden for long…the problem being the social consequences of giving them badges and guns. 

invisiblelad:

the-goddamazon:

theoriginalimpossiblesoufflegirl:

irishfino:

yungmethuselah:

blacksupervillain:

yungmethuselah:

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

Reporters confirm that police & advisors concealed the identity of Darren Wilson until he could delete all social media & move out of state.

Wow though. Darren Wilson, Ferguson’s PD and the rest of his and their supporters are an extra special breed of scumbag. What incriminating shit did he have online that needed to be swept under the rug so quickly?

I guarantee you there was some racist shit on his facebook

And it’s sitting around somewhere, still, just waiting for a subpoena. It’ll come out, it’d better come out. I’m just livid that murderer is being shielded from public scrutiny while the innocent child whose life he ended for walking outside in broad daylight while Black is being defamed.

i can’t wait until that stuff he tried to delete resurfaces because nothing is ever deleted on the internet. in fact, plenty of ToS for social sites tell you they’re gonna keep your data, not to mention the cached copies the savvy could dig up on their own, i’m sure

[popcorn]

especially on facebook. and even if it’s not subpoenaed, you can bet your bottom dollar that anonymous will be on that shit forthwith

In fact, somebody better tip Anonymous off to dig ALL THAT SHIT UP.

Over the past few days I’ve been thinking about how vile and disturbing the social media of the few cops that have made the news in Ferguson and how their twitter feeds and facebook posts going viral were more damning than their behavior broadcast across the airwaves over the past few weeks. Nobody that noxious can keep it hidden for long…the problem being the social consequences of giving them badges and guns. 

(via reverseracism)

58,463 notes

redtemplo:

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”

It’s fairly simpleFollow micdotcom

Go off x1000000

(via interstellarunity69)

56,357 notes

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

(via cannelledusoleil)

18,442 notes

The police can go to downtown Harlem and pick up a kid with a joint in the streets. But they can’t go into the elegant apartments and get a stockbroker who’s sniffing cocaine.

Noam Chomsky

I’ve seen more drugs behind the brick walls of my private college than I have ever even heard of back home in my hood.

(via newwavefeminism)

It’s a known fact that you will find more drugs,especially hard drugs, in the suburbs than in the hood

There are so many drug users & dealers at my job right now it isn’t even funny, & I’m not talking about (just) weed.

(via disrespectfuljezebel)

(Source: thoughtcatalog.com, via reverseracism)

70,173 notes

scrapes:

onesmartblackboy:

julroses:

arabellesicardi:

Here is a side by side comparison of how The New York Times has profiled Michael Brown — an 18 year old black boy gunned down by police — and how they profiled Ted Bundy, one of the most prolific serial killers of all time. 

Source for Brown, Source for Bundy.

this is so fucking fucked up and disgusting look at this trash. HOW COULD ANYONE DENY THIS SHIT IS RACIALLY CHARGED? this is beyond disgusting. what a fucking dishonor

The Bundy comparison is interesting don’t get me wrong but did yall see the article they got for Darren Wilson? Yesterday on Aug. 24 nytimes.com published both an article about Mike Brown and one about Darren Wilson. Look at this:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/25/us/darren-wilsons-unremarkable-past-offers-few-clues-into-ferguson-shooting.html

Officer Wilson, who is divorced, was born in Texas but has spent most of his years in these suburbs that surround St. Louis, records show. Family members, friends, colleagues and a lawyer have mostly refused to speak publicly about him, yet those who do paint a portrait of a well-mannered, relatively soft-spoken, even bland person who seemed, if anything, to seek out a low profile — perhaps, some suggested, a reaction to a turbulent youth in which his mother was repeatedly divorced, convicted of financial crimes and died of natural causes before he finished high school in 2004.

“He was a good kid but also a nondescript kid,” said Barney Brinkmann, who coached ice hockey at St. Charles West High School, where some who knew Officer Wilson say he narrowly got enough ice time his senior year to earn a varsity letter. A former next-door neighbor in the small city of Troy, an hour northwest of St. Louis, where Officer Wilson and his former wife lived for about a year, said he recalled Officer Wilson grilling outside from time to time and never causing trouble. And in Crestwood, southwest of St. Louis, where records show that Officer Wilson now lives with Barbara Spradling, a fellow police officer, neighbors said they rarely made much conversation.

It’s almost surprising how blatant it is. nytimes.com was able to reference an elementary school teacher to claim Darren Wilson was “a good kid” but they couldn’t find one to say the same for Mike Brown? Well then I guess there was no teachers to be found with good things to say about him then. Right?

Except wait, no, I just did. Right here in this article: 

http://www.wjla.com/articles/2014/08/michael-brown-remembered-as-little-kid-in-big-body-on-eve-of-funeral-106414.html

"My fondest memory of Mike is seeing a big kid coming in with a smile on his face, his headphones on and a big can of iced tea … and say, ‘Hey, Coach K, What’s going on? …. What do you need me to do this morning?’" recalls Charlie Kennedy, a Normandy High School health and physical education teacher. He says Brown was the kind of kid who’d hold court with "four or five kids around him, cutting up and having a good time."

Kennedy became acquainted with Brown while running a credit recovery program the young man was enrolled in that allowed him to catch up so he could graduate with his class. Brown, he says, could be led astray by kids who were bad influences but by spring, he became focused on getting his degree.

Kennedy also would bring in recording equipment Brown could use for rapping - he wanted to perform and learn a trade to help support himself. “His biggest goal was to be part of something,” the teacher adds. “He didn’t like not knowing where to fit in life. … He was kind-hearted, a little kid in a big body. He was intimidating looking, but I don’t think he ever was disrespectful to me.”

Brown loved music even as a young child. Ophelia Troupe, his art teacher for five years in elementary school, remembers a reserved, polite little boy - he’d always respond ‘yes ma’am’ or no ma’am.’ He kept to himself but lit up when she’d play her son’s beats in class as a reward if the students behaved.

"Michael was the one to say, "Be quiet so Ms. Troupe can play the beats,’" she recalls.

Troupe hadn’t seen Brown for several years until they crossed paths at his high school graduation. After the ceremony, they hugged and he told her he’d like to be a rapper and asked if her son would work with him.

The way language is being used to in those two nytimes to influence/shape conversations about Michael Brown’s and Darren Wilson’s characters isn’t even subtle. At face value one article suggests that one person had all sorts of issues, meanwhile the other person mostly didn’t any issues at all except for hey, he had a troubled childhood! Good for him for not following in his mother’s footsteps, clearly all he ever wanted to do was the right thing. Oh but Mike Brown, well… “he got into at least one scuffle with a neighbor.”

say its not about race. say it. you have to be living in a different fucking dimension if you think this is anything BUT race.

(via padarnaalat-deactivated972100372)